The Great Black Death of 1720: a decade for recovery

The Great Black Death of 1720: a decade for recovery

The first June issue of Challenges magazine recalls the so-called Great Black Death, which took place in 1720, in Marseille, southern France, a traditional center of immigration and trade.

Almost half of the population was decimated by the bacteria (bubonic plague) that would have entered the country through a cargo from a Syrian ship. It took Marseille at least a decade to recover from the consequences.

General Pierre Joseph Hyacinthe de Rouairoux, marquis de Caylus, severely prohibited circulation and threatened to shoot anyone who failed to comply.